Easter Sunday of the Resurrection of the Lord

Christus resurrexit! Resurrexit vere!
Christos Anesti! Alithos Anesti!
He is risen! He is risen indeed!

Praised be the Risen Jesus Christ for this wondrous day! The Lord has risen from the dead, conquering sin and death, opening the gates of heaven and vanquishing the ancient enemy of man, the devil. Mankind is free from the chains of evil and given the promise of eternal life—if we will only use our freedom to choose to accept the grace of Christ and live according to the Truth He proclaims through His Holy Catholic Church.
Thanks to all who worked so hard to help make this an especially Blessed Lent, Holy Week, Triduum and Easter Sunday (I’ll write more about this next week). On behalf of myself, Fr. Smith, and Fr. Daly (and all the other priests who have helped us out during Lent) may I wish you all a Blessed, Holy and Happy Easter and Easter Season! May the Risen Lord Jesus, Redeemer and Savior of the world, shower you with His grace and keep you close to Him in this Glorious Season!
And remember, today is just the beginning of this new Season of Easter. We continue to celebrate the Lord’s Resurrection for 50 days—until we celebrate the sending of the Holy Spirit on the Pentecost. We begin with the Octave of Easter, as for eight days through next Sunday we celebrate each day as if it were Easter Day. May the lessons of Lent and the joy of Easter make the coming season one of true holiness, as we go forth to live as Christ Jesus created and redeemed us to live and to love.

Oremus pro invicem. Fr. De Celles

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HOMILY OF POPE SAINT JOHN PAUL II
Easter Vigil, April 14, 1979
1. The word “death” sticks in one’s throat. Although humanity has, during so many generations, become accustomed in a way to the reality of death and to its inevitability, it is, however, something overwhelming every time.
Christ’s death had entered deeply the hearts of those closest to Him, and the consciousness of the whole of Jerusalem. The silence that followed it filled the Friday evening and the whole of the following Saturday. On this day, in accordance with Jewish regulations, no one had gone to the place of His burial. The three women, of whom today’s Gospel speaks, well remember the heavy stone with which the entrance to the sepulchre had been closed. This stone, of which they were thinking and about which they would speak the next day on their way to the sepulchre, also symbolizes the weight that had crushed their hearts. The stone that had separated the Dead One from the living, the stone that marked the limit of life, the weight of death. The women, who go to the sepulchre in the early morning of the day after the Sabbath, will not speak of death, but of the stone.
When they arrive at the spot, they will see that the stone no longer blocks the entrance to the sepulchre. It has been rolled back. They will not find Jesus in the sepulchre. They looked for Him in vain! “He is not here; for He has risen, as He said” (Mt 28:6). They are to go back to the city and announce to the disciples that He has risen again and that they will see Him in Galilee. The women are not able to utter a word. The news of death is spoken in a low voice. The words of the resurrection were even difficult for them to grasp. Difficult to repeat, so much has the reality of death influenced man’s thought and heart.
2. Since that night and even more so since that morning which followed it, Christ’s disciples have learned to utter the word “resurrection”. And it has become the most important word, the central word, the fundamental word in their language. Everything takes its origin again from it. Everything is confirmed and is constructed again: “The stone which the builders rejected has become the chief cornerstone. This is the Lord’s doing; it is marvelous in our eyes. This is the day which the Lord has made: let us rejoice and be glad in it” (Psalm 117 (118): 22-24).
It is for this very reason that the paschal vigil—the day following Good Friday—is no longer only the day on which the word “death” is spoken in a low voice, on which the last moments of the life of the Dead Man are remembered: it is the day of a great Awaiting. It is the Easter Vigil: the day and the night of waiting for the Day which the Lord has made.
The liturgical content of the Vigil is expressed by means of the various hours of the breviary and is then concentrated with all its riches in this liturgy of the night, which reaches its climax, after the period of Lent, in the first “Alleluia”.
The exclamation that rings out again in the middle of the night of waiting and brings with it already the joy of the morning. It brings with it the certainty of resurrection. That which, at the first moment, the lips of the women in front of the sepulchre or the mouths of the apostles did not have the courage to utter, now the Church, thanks to their testimony, expresses with her Alleluia….
3. …It is not possible to grasp the mystery of the Resurrection except by returning to the origins and following, thereafter, the whole development of the history of the economy of salvation up to that Moment! To the moment in which the three women of Jerusalem, stopping at the threshold of the empty sepulchre, heard the message of a young man dressed in a white robe “Do not be amazed; you seek Jesus of Nazareth, who was crucified. He has risen, He is not here” (Mk 16:5-6).
4. That great Moment does not allow us to remain outside ourselves; it compels us to enter our own humanity. Christ not only revealed to us the victory of life over death, but brought us, with His Resurrection, the New Life. He gave us this new life.
Here is how St Paul puts it: “Do you not know that all of us who have been baptized into Christ Jesus were baptized into His death? We were buried therefore with Him by baptism into death, so that as Christ was raised from the dead by the glory of the Father, we too might walk in newness of life” (Rom 6: 3-4) ….
5. This is the night of the Great Awaiting. Let us wait in Faith, let us wait with all our human being for Him who at dawn broke the tyranny of death and revealed the Divine Power of Life: He is our Hope.

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