Second Sunday of Easter – Divine Mercy Sunday

HE IS RISEN! HE IS RISEN INDEED! On this Octave day of Easter, I thank God for a truly blessed Lent, Holy Week, Triduum and Easter Sunday. I was once again overwhelmed not only by the size of the crowds at all the liturgies of the Triduum and Easter, but also by the devotion and piety of all present. I also want to thank so many people, who helped make things so special this year.
In particular, thanks to the ushers, headed by Patrick O’Brien, who did such a fine job of keeping things flowing and organized; to Nena Brennan (sacristan) and her family who spent so many hours preparing things behind the scenes; to Julie Mullen and her family and many assistants who decorated the sanctuary so beautifully with flowers (WOW!); to Brenda Doroski and Barbara Aldridge who organized the lectors and extraordinary ministers; to all the groups who ran the Soup Suppers; and to the parish staff who worked so hard all throughout Lent and Holy Week.
I want to recognize the amazing work of our choir and cantors, and especially our Music Director, Elisabeth Turco and Organist, Denise Anezin. We have the best parish choir I know of. All during Lent they all put in so many hours of extra practice, which bore special fruit in the beautiful music of Sundays, the Triduum and Easter. I thank God constantly He has given us a music program that excels at truly serving and complimenting the liturgy.
And a special recognition to Bob and Bev Ward for their work with the RCIA. Bob is, as many of you know, one of the best religion teachers around, and as a convert himself he brings a unique perspective to forming our converts. He and Bev work so many hours preparing his classes, both for RCIA and Bible Study, not to mention all the time they work with individuals privately to assist them in the faith. Thanks so much, Bob and Bev!
I also want to especially compliment the altar servers, once again directed by Mr. Jacob McCrumb as MC. It was great to see all the young men that volunteered during the Triduum and Easter Day (28 on Holy Thursday, 20 on Good Friday, 15 at the Easter Vigil and 11 and 12 at the Sunday 8:45 and 10:30 Masses). So many parishioners have come to me praising their reverence, devotion and diligence, and telling me how much it added to their prayerful experience of the liturgies. I was very proud of them all, and I sincerely believe that their service will help them to become good, strong Catholic men—most of them as good and holy husbands and fathers, and not a few of them as good and holy priests—as God wills. Of course, I’m always being complimented for our servers. The Friday before Holy Week the Bishop and numerous priests (here to offer Fr. Pilon’s funeral) commented about our excellent servers (15 had volunteered to serve the funeral).
Last but not least, thanks to Fr. Smith for his dedication and hard work. And Fr. Smith and I both thank Fr. Daly, Fr. Scalia and Fr. Jaffe for their assistance with Masses and Confessions.
I’m sure I’ve forgotten to mention a lot of folks, so please forgive me. Thanks, and God bless you all.

Sad News, with a Happy Ending. In the midst of the joy of Easter Masses, several of you may have witnessed an accident in our parking lot that wound up sending a young boy to the hospital. Thanks be to God the boy was home by Monday and back in school on Tuesday. However, he still has some healing to do both physically and emotionally, so please keep him, and his family in your prayers, as well as all parties involved. May God grant some wonderful good to blossom from this painful ordeal.

Easter Egg Hunt. Our annual Easter Egg Hunt will be held today at 1:30 pm behind the church. Please bring your children out to continue our celebration of Easter. Some think the Easter Egg is a secular custom, but in reality, it a very ancient Christian tradition dating perhaps to the 1st century. One ancient legend says that Mary Magdalene and the other holy women carried a breakfast of boiled eggs when they went to the tomb of Jesus on Easter morning, and when they found the empty tomb they discovered the eggs had miraculously turned bright colors. Another ancient legend says that after the Pentecost, Magdalene boldly approached the Roman Emperor, Tiberius Caesar, and held out an egg to explain how, like a chick would burst forth from an egg, Jesus had burst forth from the tomb. Tiberius mocked her saying there was as much a chance of the dead rising as the egg in her hand turning red. But then the egg miraculous turned red before his eyes.

Divine Mercy Sunday. This Second Sunday in the Octave of Easter is also known as “Divine Mercy Sunday,” established as such in 2000 by Pope John Paul II, in recognition of the mercy that flows to all mankind from the Paschal Mystery of Christ’s suffering, death and resurrection. The Pope was inspired by the claims of St. Faustina Kowalska that Jesus Himself had requested this during His private apparitions to her during the 1930s. The Lord reportedly also told St. Faustina: “I pour out a whole ocean of graces upon those souls who approach the fount of My mercy. The soul that will go to Confession and receive Holy Communion shall obtain the complete forgiveness of sins and punishment. On that day all the divine floodgates through which grace flow are opened.”
Although private apparitions/revelations such as this need not be believed by Catholics, this one, as with many others, has been recognized by the Church as “worthy of belief” (i.e., there is no danger in following it). Moreover, the Church which has established a plenary indulgence for this Sunday: “…granted under the usual conditions (sacramental confession , Eucharistic communion and prayer for the intentions of Supreme Pontiff) to the faithful who, on the Second Sunday of Easter or Divine Mercy Sunday, in any church or chapel, in a spirit that is completely detached from the affection for a sin, even a venial sin, take part in the prayers and devotions held in honor of Divine Mercy, or who, in the presence of the Blessed Sacrament exposed or reserved in the tabernacle, recite the Our Father and the Creed, adding a devout prayer to the merciful Lord Jesus (e.g. “Merciful Jesus, I trust in you!”).” You may go to confession “within several days (about 20) before or after the indulgenced act.” For a brief explanation of indulgences, see the Catechism of the Catholic Church, 1471ff.]

Easter Continues. Of course, the Season of Easter continues until Pentecost Sunday, May 20. This extended liturgical season reminds us of the ongoing importance of the Resurrection to all of us throughout the year: Christ has truly risen, and lives today in our midst, may we always live as if we believe that!

Oremus pro invicem. Fr. De Celles

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