Sixth Sunday of Easter

First Holy Communion. This week was a big week for our second graders as yesterday (Saturday) they received Our Lord in Holy Communion for the very first time. What a great thing for these children, to receive our Lord’s Body, Blood, Soul and Divinity; to have the Lord come to them in the flesh, and join them to Himself in this miracle. And what a beautiful thing to see these little ones receive with such innocence and faith. If only we adults could receive with the simple faith so many of these little ones have, and recognize the miracle of the Love we receive in this sacrament, our intimate Communion with Jesus. The Lord tells us “unless you turn and become like children, you will never enter the kingdom of heaven.” Does this not refer in a particular way to the Eucharist, which is Christ Himself, who is the kingdom? The children believe simply because we assure them that Jesus is God, and so has the power to do anything He wants and will always tell us the truth, and that Jesus Himself said of the bread, “This is my Body.” And so they believe. So simple. Do we believe? If not, why not? The same simple logic of children should be logical to us adults: God can’t lie, God can do anything, Jesus is God, Jesus says “This is my Body.”
Let us pray for our little ones today, that they may always believe as they do today, and receive this sacrament with the openness they do today. But let us also pray for ourselves—that we may become like our little children.

May is the Month of Mary. Today (Sunday, May 6) after the 12:15 Mass we will mark this devotion with the “May Crowning.” All are invited to join us. Also, I encourage all of you to keep this devotion by praying the Rosary during this month—even every day. I especially encourage all families to pray the Rosary together at least once a week. In the words of Saint John Paul II: “The family that recites the Rosary together reproduces something of the atmosphere of the household of Nazareth: its members place Jesus at the center, they share His joys and sorrows, they place their needs and their plans in His hands, they draw from Him the hope and the strength to go on” (Rosarium Virginis Mariae, 41).

Spring and Summer. Spring has finally sprung, which means we will begin again to experience two things at Mass: more noise and less clothes. Both of these are somewhat understandable: as they become more active outside little ones seem to tend to be more active inside also, and as it becomes warmer outside, all of us tend to wear less clothing.
The only dress code we have St. Raymond’s is to use common sense, as well as Christian modesty, chastity and charity. Growing up in Texas, I understand all about dressing for the heat. But let’s remember two things. First, please try not to dress like you’re going to the pool when you’re coming to Mass. On the other hand, if someone does come to Mass in a t-shirt let’s assume they have an important reason for doing so. The second thing to remember is that the more skin we show the more likely we are to be the near occasion of sin to others. So I ask all of you, wherever you are this summer—whether on the beach, on a date, or at Mass—please consider the spiritual well-being of others.
Also, we love to have little children at Mass. But all of us (including their parents) would also prefer if they would be peaceful and quiet at Mass. But that isn’t always the way it is—especially at this time of year. So once again, I encourage all of you, in charity, to be patient and supportive of parents and children—parenting is very difficult in the present cultural environment, so we have to help them every way we can. On the other hand, parents, please remember to do what you can, and when a child gets really out of hand at Mass, or if they continue to make noise (especially talking or shouting) please consider moving to the “Family Room” or the narthex until they quiet down. God bless you parents and your little ones!

Narthex and Family Room. Which reminds me: during the Mass the Narthex is not a place for conversation—I consider it a part of the church where people who cannot be in the main part can reverently attend Mass. Some folks have little children who need a break from the pew, and some folks don’t feel comfortable sitting in the pews (for various legitimate reasons). I’m happy these folks feel comfortable in the narthex, and out of charity ask that we all respect their right to participate in the Mass in the Narthex without further unnecessary distractions. So, please, from when the announcements start before Mass, until the Hail Mary is completed after Mass, let’s keep the Narthex a prayerful place.
Also, please remember the Narthex and the Family Room are NOT play rooms. Out of respect for the other families present, children should not be allowed to run around or make excessive noise.

Italian Dinner. Thanks to the Knights of Columbus for reviving the Italian Dinner for us this year, taking place next Saturday, May 12. Like all of our other dinners and socials it is so important to the life of our parish in order to encourage and promote good Christian fellowship. I suppose such organized fellowship is not absolutely necessary—grace (and the sacraments), the teachings of Christ, and the life of prayer and virtue are the keys to salvation. And hermits live alone and flourish. But for the vast majority of us, weak as we are, the support we receive from the holy friendship of other Christians can make so much difference in our ability to live out our faith. Families are made to live and love together, and so is the family of Jesus. And while this familial life and love is experienced and renewed par excellence in the Holy Mass, the grace and lessons of the Mass should overflow and transform the rest of life. Dinners such as this give us an opportunity, an example, and a secure environment within which to grow in our practice of fraternal love for each other, loving one another as Christ has loved us.

Sign of Peace. I’m still accepting feedback on my questions/comments about the exchange of the sign of peace. So far, I’ve received more input on this than any other question I’ve ever posed to you. Lots of responses. I’m surprised how many people agree with my assessment of the problem, and want me to make a change. But I’m still accepting input, so please don’t hesitate to send an email to me or call the parish office. I read them all. (And thanks to everyone for their kind and respectful tone).

Oremus pro invicem. Fr. De Celles

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