Thirteenth Sunday in Ordinary Time

Lighting Work Begins This Week. Remember that the work to install our new lighting
will begin this Monday, July 2, and will finish by September 1. The upstairs church will
be closed from Monday through Friday every week, and the Blessed Sacrament, Masses,
etc., will be moved to the downstairs Parish Hall during the week. The church will be
reopened every Saturday morning and all weekend Masses, etc. will be in the church as
usual. Thanks for your patience and cooperation. And please pray to St. Raymond that all
goes well with the lighting “fix” (see below).
Supreme Court Win for Pro-Lifers. “The US Supreme Court has struck down a portion
of a California law that requires [pro-life] pregnancy-help centers to provide women
with promotional material about abortion. Writing for a 5-4 majority, Justice Clarence
Thomas said: ‘California cannot co-opt the licensed facilities to deliver its message.’ The
decision, on free-speech grounds, suggests that pro-life forces will also succeed to
challenging similar legislation in Illinois and in Hawaii” [source: Catholic World News).
Praised be Jesus Christ!
Litany and Prayer to St. Raymond of Peñafort. In today’s bulletin we’ve included an
insert with a new Litany and Prayer to St. Raymond. I encourage you to incorporate at
least the “Prayer” at the end of the Litany into your regular daily prayers, and so draw
closer to our great Saint. I’d especially like you all to pray at least the prayer every day
during the electrical work in the church.
For years, I have been looking for a good prayer to our Saint, but have been
unsatisfied with what I’ve found. So, I thought I’d try to write something original, and I
am thankful to Bishop Burbidge for quickly giving his imprimatur so that it can be
prayed publicly in the Church.
A lot of Catholics have no idea who St. Raymond was, and most of those who do
think of him as simply a great Canon Lawyer. But, of course, he was much more than
that. So let’s look at the litany and prayer and consider what it’s trying to recall.
Let’s begin with the titles of the Litany:
— “Master of Preachers,” reminds us both that he was a phenomenal preacher and
the head (“Master General”) of the religious order called the “Order of Preachers”—the
Dominicans.
— “Patron of Lawyers,” reminds us of his role in editing and combining all the
various laws of the Church written over 11 centuries in order to issue a well-organized
and codified set of laws for the Church. He is called “Father of Canon Law,” and is
officially the patron saint of all lawyers.
— “Father of Confessors” and “Counselor of Penitents,” remind of his great
treatise, Summa de casibus poenitentiae, written as a scholarly guide for priests in the
confessional.
— “Apostle to Gentiles,” reminds us of his work to convert Spanish Moors
(Muslims, i.e., the “Gentiles” of his day), especially through thoughtful preaching, and of
his encouraging St. Thomas Aquinas to write his great treatise, Summa contra Gentiles,
to help in this regard.

— “Evangelist to Israelites,” reminds of his work to respectfully convert Spanish
Jews; it is said that he was responsible for the conversion of over 30,000 Moors and Jews.
— “Ransomer of Captives,” reminds us of his role in the foundation of Order of
Mercy, or Mercedarians, who were dedicated to ransoming Christian captives of the
Moorish pirates, even offering their own lives in exchange.
— “Teacher of the Learned and the Ignorant,” reminds of his ability to preach to
the well-educated as he was a university professor for many years, and to the under-
educated as he preached in Churches to the masses.
— “Friend of Princes and Paupers,” reminds of us his influential friendship with
people in high places, such as Kings and Popes, as well as his kindness and tenderness to
the poor and lowly.
— “Protector of Sailors,” recalls the miracle of Majorca, where, by the grace of
God, he turned his cape into both skiff and sail, to flee the island and sail to Spain.
— “Comforter of the Aged,” reminds us that he lived to be either 99 or 100 years
old, and is an example of Christian fidelity for the aged, as well as a special friend to
them.
— “Defender of Marriage,” reminds both of his important scholarly treatise,
Summa on Marriage, and his public rebuke of King James’ infidelity in Majorca (see
“Protector of Sailors,” above).
— “Champion of Religious Rights,” “Advocate of Reason,” and “Promoter of
Freedom,” all remind us how, in efforts to convert Jews and Muslims, he encouraged
reasoned discussion, including the famous public debate involving the leading Rabbi of
Spain in 1263. Although not up to modern standards, Raymond’s efforts represented
remarkable strides for religious rights and freedom of speech for his time.
— “Guardian of Justice,” reminds us that as one of the Church’s most expert
scholars of law as well as the Penitentiary of the Church, he was a historical promoter of
justice in both civil society and the Church, exercising his influence in a particular way
over Popes and Kings.
— “Worker of Miracles,” reminds of the many miracles he performed, from the
curing of the sick, to the conversion of obstinate sinners, to the miracle of Majorca.
— “Son of the Blessed Virgin Mary,” reminds of his great love and devotion to
Mary, and of her appearance to him in 1218.
— “Son of St. Dominic,” reminds us of his membership in the “Order of
Preachers” founded by St. Dominic.
— “Son of the Church,” reminds us of his deep love for Holy Mother Church.
— “Holy Priest of Jesus Christ,” reminds us that with all his amazing
accomplishments, he was first and foremost a priest.
The Prayer itself (which can easily be said separately from the Litany) is pretty
self-explanatory. But I call your attention to some nuances.
This prayer can be said by anyone, but it is first for our parish, and so it refers to
him as “patron,” and to “those entrusted to your care.” Then it mentions “all who flee to
your protection,” a subtle reference to his fleeing from Majorca. It speaks of his

“teaching,” as he was a teacher and scholar, and his help to “proclaim the truth of the
Gospel to all we meet,” referring to his constant preaching to Christians, heretics, Jews
and Muslims. Then it refers to “the fullness of our years,” alluding to his advanced age at
death. Then we ask him to “guide us home to heaven,” which is ultimate goal as our
patron. And finally the phrase says, “to live in peace,” is a reference to his prayer for us,
that “the God of love and peace set your hearts at rest… and brin[g] you at last to that
place of complete plenitude….in the vision of peace….”
4 th of July. Have a blessed 4 th ! Please join us for Mass at 10am to thank God for our great
country and to pray for it.
Oremus pro invicem. Fr. De Celles

Bookmark the permalink.

Comments are closed