Fourth Sunday of Easter

Sign of Peace. Due to the flu epidemic, for the last few months priests celebrating Sunday Masses at St. Raymond’s have often omitted inviting the congregation to exchange the “sign of peace.” This Sunday we will revert to my usual policy of allowing the priest to make invitation (at his discretion). But even as I do this, I continue to be concerned that, as the Vatican’s Congregation for Divine Worship (CDW) noted in 2014, there is need for “greater restraint in this gesture, which can be exaggerated and cause a certain distraction…just before the reception of Communion.” Now, I am very pleased that we exchange the sign of peace with much more reverence than most other parishes. Even so, some still don’t seem to understand its actual meaning and purpose, and so still use it as a time to exchange merely friendly greetings, or as the CDW says, “the occasion for expressing congratulations, best wishes or condolences….”. But the sign of peace is so much more than that. As the CDW noted: “The sign of peace…is placed between the Lord’s Prayer, to which is joined the embolism which prepares for the gesture of peace, and the breaking of the bread, in the course of which the Lamb of God is implored to give us His peace. With this gesture, whose function is to manifest peace, communion and charity, …the faithful express to each other their ecclesial communion and mutual charity before communicating in the Sacrament, that is, the Body of Christ the Lord.” Thus, the sign of peace inherently flows from and leads back to the Eucharist: “By its nature the Eucharist is the sacrament of peace.…[T]his dimension of the Eucharistic mystery finds specific expression in the sign of peace.” “It should be made clear once and for all that the rite of peace already has its own profound meaning of prayer and offering of peace in the context of the Eucharist.” (For a further discussion of this, please see my homily from last week, or the video excerpt from this year’s Lenten series, both of which are available on the parish website). The CDW went on to say, “If it is foreseen that it will not take place properly ….it can …and sometimes ought to be omitted.” Should I omit the exchange of the sign of peace at all Masses? I sincerely don’t want to. I’d like to keep it, but do it better. One thing I’ve been thinking of is inspired by something else the CDW wrote: “[I]n0 those places where familiar and profane gestures of greeting were previously chosen, they could be replaced with other more appropriate gestures.” It occurs to me that the handshakes are “familiar and profane gestures of greeting,” and so perhaps we could use another gesture, one that is inherently more liturgical. In particular, I was thinking that perhaps we might turn only to the person on our left and right (so, just 2 people) and, with folded hands, give a slight bow of the head or shoulders, much like the servers do when they serve the priest at the altar. This might be a nice compromise, keeping the exchange, but making it more reverent, sober and liturgical. (It also solves the very real problem of those who are uncomfortable, being forced to shake a stranger’s hand—in charity, we shouldn’t dismiss their sensibilities). I’m just “thinking out loud” here. I haven’t made up my mind. But I would very much like your input: what can we do to make the exchange more reverent and “sober”? Would the bowing alternative above be a good idea? Etc. So please,
write me a note (email me at fr.decelles@gmail.com) or call the office and leave a brief message with the secretary. But please, keep your note short and to the point so I will be able to read it quickly. Also, please be respectful and courteous. And note, this is not a vote, but input. I may make no changes at all. Maybe all that will come of this is an increased awareness of the meaning of the sign of peace. Thanks for your patience and consideration.
Prayers for Priests and Future Priests. For decades the Arlington Diocese had the reputation of being largely spared from the nationwide (and worldwide) shortage of priests. But in the last few years, as the number of parishioners has rapidly increased in the Diocese, priestly ordinations have been declining. Moreover, the number of priests from other dioceses who are living in residence in our parishes (and helping with some Masses and confessions) while attending various Catholic theology schools in the area has also dropped. And so, the priest-shortage is starting to be felt in Arlington, especially in the last few months, when 6 diocesan priests have left active ministry in the diocese for various reasons. And this has created at least an immediate “staffing” problem—there aren’t enough priests to provide the services we are all used to. We’ve seen this at St. Raymond’s: 6 years ago, we had 4 priests (2 Arlington priests assigned, and 2 students), now we have just 2. At the same time parishes twice our size are making due with 3 or even 2 priests. All this leads me to wonder about what will happen this summer when new assignments are announced. Will some of the smaller to medium size parishes (we are “medium sized”) go from 2 priests to 1 in order to provide a 3rd or 4th priest for some larger parishes? This is all speculation on my part. Frankly, I don’t think St. Raymond’s will be affected—it would seem to me that there are several smaller parishes which are much more likely to be affected (smaller parishes with 2 priests). In any case, this leads me to ask 4 things of you. First, pray for the priests of our diocese, that they remain strong, committed and not overworked. Second, pray that the Bishop doesn’t transfer either Fr. Smith or me this summer (I don’t think he will, but…). Third, pray for an increase in vocations to the priesthood in our diocese—especially from our parish: right now, we only have one seminarian from St. Raymond’s, when we should have many more. I look around and I see all the young men who reverently attend Mass and go to frequent confession, and I think, surely we should be producing at least 1 if not several vocations a year. So, pray for our young men, that they take time to listen to God and talk to Him about His plan for them. And pray that they have the courage, the faith, hope and love to answer the call. In particular, pray for your sons and brothers. Fortunately, there are great signs of hope on the horizon: the number of Arlington seminarians is increasing, and I’m told that next year Arlington’s First Theology Class will have 14 men in it, meaning possibly 14 new priests in 4 years. So, fourth, pray for our seminarians, that they persevere in pursuing Our Lord’s plan for them.
Oremus pro invicem. Fr. De Celle

Third Sunday of Easter

Resting and Catching-Up. It was a good but very busy Lent and Easter for us priests. Unfortunately, with all the attention given to the special activities of Lent and the Triduum, some of our ordinary work gets postponed or overlooked. That is especially the case this year for me, as I had to prepare and give the Lenten Series on Thursday evenings. So, I am going to have to do some catch-up in the next few weeks. But before that, I’m off to Williamsburg for a few days of resting and golfing. (I’ll be back by the time you read this on Sunday). Then this coming week, Fr. Smith will take a few days off, and then at the end of the month, we both have to go to the annual priests’ convocation for a couple of days each. So, I ask you for your patience with us, especially with me. If I owe you a phone call or email from Lent, please remind me. And thanks for your continuing patient kindness.
Great Conference on Transgender. We had a wonderful turnout, about 200 folks for our Conference last Saturday, and the three presenters did not disappoint. if you missed it, the video and power-point pages will be on the website soon. I strongly encourage you, especially parents, to view it. Thanks for all who made it work out so well.
Oremus pro invicem. Fr. De Celles
+++++ HOMILY OF POPE FRANCIS Easter Vigil in the Holy Night of Easter March 31, 2018
We began this celebration outside, plunged in the darkness of the night and the cold. We felt an oppressive silence at the death of the Lord, a silence with which each of us can identify, a silence that penetrates to the depths of the heart of every disciple, who stands wordless before the cross. These are the hours when the disciple stands speechless in pain at the death of Jesus. What words can be spoken at such a moment? The disciple keeps silent in the awareness of his or her own reactions during those crucial hours in the Lord’s life. Before the injustice that condemned the Master, his disciples were silent. Before the calumnies and the false testimony that the Master endured, his disciples said nothing. During the trying, painful hours of the Passion, his disciples dramatically experienced their inability to put their lives on the line to speak out on behalf of the Master. What is more, not only did they not acknowledge him: they hid, they escaped, they kept silent (cf. Jn 18:25-27). It is the silent night of the disciples who remained numb, paralyzed and uncertain of what to do amid so many painful and disheartening situations. It is also that of today’s disciples, speechless in the face of situations we cannot control, that make us feel and, even worse, believe that nothing can be done to reverse all the injustices that our brothers and sisters are experiencing in their flesh. It is the silent night of those disciples who are disoriented because they are plunged in a crushing routine that robs memory, silences hope and leads to thinking that
“this is the way things have always been done”. Those disciples who, overwhelmed, have nothing to say and end up considering “normal” and unexceptional the words of Caiaphas: “Can you not see that it is better for you to have one man die for the people than to have the whole nation destroyed?” (Jn 11:50). Amid our silence, our overpowering silence, the stones begin to cry out (cf. Lk 19:40)[1] and to clear the way for the greatest message that history has ever heard: “He is not here, for he has been raised” (Mt 28:6). The stone before the tomb cried out and proclaimed the opening of a new way for all. Creation itself was the first to echo the triumph of life over all that had attempted to silence and stifle the joy of the Gospel. The stone before the tomb was the first to leap up and in its own way intone a song of praise and wonder, of joy and hope, in which all of us are invited to join. Yesterday, we joined the women in contemplating “the one who was pierced” (cf. Jn 19:36; cf. Zech 12:10). Today, with them, we are invited to contemplate the empty tomb and to hear the words of the angel: “Do not be afraid… for he has been raised” (Mt28:5-6). Those words should affect our deepest convictions and certainties, the ways we judge and deal with the events of our daily lives, especially the ways we relate to others. The empty tomb should challenge us and rally our spirits. It should make us think, but above all it should encourage us to trust and believe that God “happens” in every situation and every person, and that his light can shine in the least expected and most hidden corners of our lives. He rose from the dead, from that place where nobody waits for anything, and now he waits for us – as he did the women – to enable us to share in his saving work. On this basis and with this strength, we Christians place our lives and our energy, our intelligence, our affections and our will, at the service of discovering, and above all creating, paths of dignity. He is not here… he is risen! This is the message that sustains our hope and turns it into concrete gestures of charity. How greatly we need to let our frailty be anointed by this experience! How greatly we need to let our faith be revived! How greatly we need our myopic horizons to be challenged and renewed by this message! Christ is risen, and with him he makes our hope and creativity rise, so that we can face our present problems in the knowledge that we are not alone. To celebrate Easter is to believe once more that God constantly breaks into our personal histories, challenging our “conventions”, those fixed ways of thinking and acting that end up paralyzing us. To celebrate Easter is to allow Jesus to triumph over the craven fear that so often assails us and tries to bury every kind of hope. The stone before the tomb shared in this, the women of the Gospel shared in this, and now the invitation is addressed once more to you and to me. An invitation to break out of our routines and to renew our lives, our decisions and our existence. An invitation that must be directed to where we stand, what we are doing and what we are, with the “power ratio” that is ours. Do we want to share in this message of life or do we prefer simply to continue standing speechless before events as they happen? He is not here… he is raised! And he awaits you in Galilee. He invites you to go back to the time and place of your first love and he says to you: Do not be afraid, follow me

Second Sunday of Easter – Divine Mercy Sunday

HE IS RISEN! HE IS RISEN INDEED! On this Octave day of Easter, I thank God for a truly blessed Lent, Holy Week, Triduum and Easter Sunday. I was once again overwhelmed not only by the size of the crowds at all the liturgies of the Triduum and Easter, but also by the devotion and piety of all present. I also want to thank so many people, who helped make things so special this year.
In particular, thanks to the ushers, headed by Patrick O’Brien, who did such a fine job of keeping things flowing and organized; to Nena Brennan (sacristan) and her family who spent so many hours preparing things behind the scenes; to Julie Mullen and her family and many assistants who decorated the sanctuary so beautifully with flowers (WOW!); to Brenda Doroski and Barbara Aldridge who organized the lectors and extraordinary ministers; to all the groups who ran the Soup Suppers; and to the parish staff who worked so hard all throughout Lent and Holy Week.
I want to recognize the amazing work of our choir and cantors, and especially our Music Director, Elisabeth Turco and Organist, Denise Anezin. We have the best parish choir I know of. All during Lent they all put in so many hours of extra practice, which bore special fruit in the beautiful music of Sundays, the Triduum and Easter. I thank God constantly He has given us a music program that excels at truly serving and complimenting the liturgy.
And a special recognition to Bob and Bev Ward for their work with the RCIA. Bob is, as many of you know, one of the best religion teachers around, and as a convert himself he brings a unique perspective to forming our converts. He and Bev work so many hours preparing his classes, both for RCIA and Bible Study, not to mention all the time they work with individuals privately to assist them in the faith. Thanks so much, Bob and Bev!
I also want to especially compliment the altar servers, once again directed by Mr. Jacob McCrumb as MC. It was great to see all the young men that volunteered during the Triduum and Easter Day (28 on Holy Thursday, 20 on Good Friday, 15 at the Easter Vigil and 11 and 12 at the Sunday 8:45 and 10:30 Masses). So many parishioners have come to me praising their reverence, devotion and diligence, and telling me how much it added to their prayerful experience of the liturgies. I was very proud of them all, and I sincerely believe that their service will help them to become good, strong Catholic men—most of them as good and holy husbands and fathers, and not a few of them as good and holy priests—as God wills. Of course, I’m always being complimented for our servers. The Friday before Holy Week the Bishop and numerous priests (here to offer Fr. Pilon’s funeral) commented about our excellent servers (15 had volunteered to serve the funeral).
Last but not least, thanks to Fr. Smith for his dedication and hard work. And Fr. Smith and I both thank Fr. Daly, Fr. Scalia and Fr. Jaffe for their assistance with Masses and Confessions.
I’m sure I’ve forgotten to mention a lot of folks, so please forgive me. Thanks, and God bless you all.

Sad News, with a Happy Ending. In the midst of the joy of Easter Masses, several of you may have witnessed an accident in our parking lot that wound up sending a young boy to the hospital. Thanks be to God the boy was home by Monday and back in school on Tuesday. However, he still has some healing to do both physically and emotionally, so please keep him, and his family in your prayers, as well as all parties involved. May God grant some wonderful good to blossom from this painful ordeal.

Easter Egg Hunt. Our annual Easter Egg Hunt will be held today at 1:30 pm behind the church. Please bring your children out to continue our celebration of Easter. Some think the Easter Egg is a secular custom, but in reality, it a very ancient Christian tradition dating perhaps to the 1st century. One ancient legend says that Mary Magdalene and the other holy women carried a breakfast of boiled eggs when they went to the tomb of Jesus on Easter morning, and when they found the empty tomb they discovered the eggs had miraculously turned bright colors. Another ancient legend says that after the Pentecost, Magdalene boldly approached the Roman Emperor, Tiberius Caesar, and held out an egg to explain how, like a chick would burst forth from an egg, Jesus had burst forth from the tomb. Tiberius mocked her saying there was as much a chance of the dead rising as the egg in her hand turning red. But then the egg miraculous turned red before his eyes.

Divine Mercy Sunday. This Second Sunday in the Octave of Easter is also known as “Divine Mercy Sunday,” established as such in 2000 by Pope John Paul II, in recognition of the mercy that flows to all mankind from the Paschal Mystery of Christ’s suffering, death and resurrection. The Pope was inspired by the claims of St. Faustina Kowalska that Jesus Himself had requested this during His private apparitions to her during the 1930s. The Lord reportedly also told St. Faustina: “I pour out a whole ocean of graces upon those souls who approach the fount of My mercy. The soul that will go to Confession and receive Holy Communion shall obtain the complete forgiveness of sins and punishment. On that day all the divine floodgates through which grace flow are opened.”
Although private apparitions/revelations such as this need not be believed by Catholics, this one, as with many others, has been recognized by the Church as “worthy of belief” (i.e., there is no danger in following it). Moreover, the Church which has established a plenary indulgence for this Sunday: “…granted under the usual conditions (sacramental confession , Eucharistic communion and prayer for the intentions of Supreme Pontiff) to the faithful who, on the Second Sunday of Easter or Divine Mercy Sunday, in any church or chapel, in a spirit that is completely detached from the affection for a sin, even a venial sin, take part in the prayers and devotions held in honor of Divine Mercy, or who, in the presence of the Blessed Sacrament exposed or reserved in the tabernacle, recite the Our Father and the Creed, adding a devout prayer to the merciful Lord Jesus (e.g. “Merciful Jesus, I trust in you!”).” You may go to confession “within several days (about 20) before or after the indulgenced act.” For a brief explanation of indulgences, see the Catechism of the Catholic Church, 1471ff.]

Easter Continues. Of course, the Season of Easter continues until Pentecost Sunday, May 20. This extended liturgical season reminds us of the ongoing importance of the Resurrection to all of us throughout the year: Christ has truly risen, and lives today in our midst, may we always live as if we believe that!

Oremus pro invicem. Fr. De Celles

Easter Sunday of the Resurrection of the Lord

Christus resurrexit! Resurrexit vere!
Christos Anesti! Alithos Anesti!
He is risen! He is risen indeed!

Praised be the Risen Jesus Christ for this wondrous day! The Lord has risen from the dead, conquering sin and death, opening the gates of heaven and vanquishing the ancient enemy of man, the devil. Mankind is free from the chains of evil and given the promise of eternal life—if we will only use our freedom to choose to accept the grace of Christ and live according to the Truth He proclaims through His Holy Catholic Church.
Thanks to all who worked so hard to help make this an especially Blessed Lent, Holy Week, Triduum and Easter Sunday (I’ll write more about this next week). On behalf of myself, Fr. Smith, and Fr. Daly (and all the other priests who have helped us out during Lent) may I wish you all a Blessed, Holy and Happy Easter and Easter Season! May the Risen Lord Jesus, Redeemer and Savior of the world, shower you with His grace and keep you close to Him in this Glorious Season!
And remember, today is just the beginning of this new Season of Easter. We continue to celebrate the Lord’s Resurrection for 50 days—until we celebrate the sending of the Holy Spirit on the Pentecost. We begin with the Octave of Easter, as for eight days through next Sunday we celebrate each day as if it were Easter Day. May the lessons of Lent and the joy of Easter make the coming season one of true holiness, as we go forth to live as Christ Jesus created and redeemed us to live and to love.

Oremus pro invicem. Fr. De Celles

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HOMILY OF POPE SAINT JOHN PAUL II
Easter Vigil, April 14, 1979
1. The word “death” sticks in one’s throat. Although humanity has, during so many generations, become accustomed in a way to the reality of death and to its inevitability, it is, however, something overwhelming every time.
Christ’s death had entered deeply the hearts of those closest to Him, and the consciousness of the whole of Jerusalem. The silence that followed it filled the Friday evening and the whole of the following Saturday. On this day, in accordance with Jewish regulations, no one had gone to the place of His burial. The three women, of whom today’s Gospel speaks, well remember the heavy stone with which the entrance to the sepulchre had been closed. This stone, of which they were thinking and about which they would speak the next day on their way to the sepulchre, also symbolizes the weight that had crushed their hearts. The stone that had separated the Dead One from the living, the stone that marked the limit of life, the weight of death. The women, who go to the sepulchre in the early morning of the day after the Sabbath, will not speak of death, but of the stone.
When they arrive at the spot, they will see that the stone no longer blocks the entrance to the sepulchre. It has been rolled back. They will not find Jesus in the sepulchre. They looked for Him in vain! “He is not here; for He has risen, as He said” (Mt 28:6). They are to go back to the city and announce to the disciples that He has risen again and that they will see Him in Galilee. The women are not able to utter a word. The news of death is spoken in a low voice. The words of the resurrection were even difficult for them to grasp. Difficult to repeat, so much has the reality of death influenced man’s thought and heart.
2. Since that night and even more so since that morning which followed it, Christ’s disciples have learned to utter the word “resurrection”. And it has become the most important word, the central word, the fundamental word in their language. Everything takes its origin again from it. Everything is confirmed and is constructed again: “The stone which the builders rejected has become the chief cornerstone. This is the Lord’s doing; it is marvelous in our eyes. This is the day which the Lord has made: let us rejoice and be glad in it” (Psalm 117 (118): 22-24).
It is for this very reason that the paschal vigil—the day following Good Friday—is no longer only the day on which the word “death” is spoken in a low voice, on which the last moments of the life of the Dead Man are remembered: it is the day of a great Awaiting. It is the Easter Vigil: the day and the night of waiting for the Day which the Lord has made.
The liturgical content of the Vigil is expressed by means of the various hours of the breviary and is then concentrated with all its riches in this liturgy of the night, which reaches its climax, after the period of Lent, in the first “Alleluia”.
The exclamation that rings out again in the middle of the night of waiting and brings with it already the joy of the morning. It brings with it the certainty of resurrection. That which, at the first moment, the lips of the women in front of the sepulchre or the mouths of the apostles did not have the courage to utter, now the Church, thanks to their testimony, expresses with her Alleluia….
3. …It is not possible to grasp the mystery of the Resurrection except by returning to the origins and following, thereafter, the whole development of the history of the economy of salvation up to that Moment! To the moment in which the three women of Jerusalem, stopping at the threshold of the empty sepulchre, heard the message of a young man dressed in a white robe “Do not be amazed; you seek Jesus of Nazareth, who was crucified. He has risen, He is not here” (Mk 16:5-6).
4. That great Moment does not allow us to remain outside ourselves; it compels us to enter our own humanity. Christ not only revealed to us the victory of life over death, but brought us, with His Resurrection, the New Life. He gave us this new life.
Here is how St Paul puts it: “Do you not know that all of us who have been baptized into Christ Jesus were baptized into His death? We were buried therefore with Him by baptism into death, so that as Christ was raised from the dead by the glory of the Father, we too might walk in newness of life” (Rom 6: 3-4) ….
5. This is the night of the Great Awaiting. Let us wait in Faith, let us wait with all our human being for Him who at dawn broke the tyranny of death and revealed the Divine Power of Life: He is our Hope.

Palm Sunday of the Passion of the Lord

Holy Week begins Today. In these last days of Lent we spiritually place ourselves with Our Lord as He suffered in His last hours: as He agonizes in the garden, is scourged, spat upon, mocked, and crowned with thorns; as He carries the cross, is nailed to it and hung upon it for three hours to die. Who can look at this and not be overwhelmed, not simply with grief for His suffering, but also with love for Him who has loved us so much?
For almost 40 days, we’ve been trying to grow in love through Christ’s grace and our Lenten penances. We have one more week: let’s make it a truly “holy” week centered on Jesus’ suffering and ineffable love.
One of the best ways to do this is to come together for the special liturgies of this Holy Week. We have begun this today, with this unique Mass of Palm Sunday of the Passion of the Lord, with the blessed Palms, the Procession and reading of the Passion.
Then on Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday, come to daily Mass—let’s fill the church with prayer! And if you haven’t been yet this Lent, come to confession—our Lord awaits you there, to wash you clean with the grace pouring from His side on the Cross.
On Holy Thursday, there is no Mass during the day (except at the Cathedral), but in the evening join us here in the parish for The Mass of the Lord’s Supper at 7:00 pm, commemorating the institution of the Sacraments of the Eucharist and Priesthood. And afterward, walk in procession with the Eucharist to an altar in the Parish Hall, as if walking with the Lord to the Garden of Gethsemane, where the Lord invites you to “remain here, and watch with Me…watch and pray,” for at least a few minutes or until midnight.
Then comes Good Friday, the holiest day of the year. It is a day of fasting and abstinence as we share in the suffering of the Lord. We should keep the day with quiet, reflection, and charity—even at work—especially from noon to three. There is no Mass; instead we gather in the church at 3:00 in the afternoon, the hour of our Lord’s death, for the solemn Celebration of the Passion of the Lord. I beg you not to miss it, even if it means leaving work early! This is the holiest hour of the year—come and be with the Church to worship Christ at the hour of His death; what could be more important than this?!
We begin this unique liturgy with the priest prostrating himself before the altar, and all joining him by kneeling. We then read the Passion from the Gospel of John. Then the priest prays ten ancient ritual intercessions, calling down our Lord’s mercy on the Church and the world. Then we individually come forward to personally venerate the Cross, by a genuflection, kiss, or some other gesture. This takes some time, but everyone waits so patiently, as the beautiful strains of our choir help us to place ourselves for a few minutes waiting with the Blessed Mother, St. John and St. Mary Magdalene at the foot of the Cross. After this, the priests bring the Blessed Sacrament from the sacristy and the faithful receive Holy Communion, and the rite concludes. (Stations of the Cross are prayed at 7:00pm).
On Holy Saturday the Church continues its somber reflective mood, as She encourages us to continue to fast and abstain from meat as we do on Good Friday. The only Mass this day begins at 8:30pm (after sunset), as the celebration of Easter Sunday begins with the Easter Vigil Mass, a liturgy filled with all sorts of unique ceremonies: the presentation of the Easter Candle; the chanting of the Exsultet; an extended Liturgy of the Word; and Baptism, and Confirmation for adults. I encourage all to attend. (However, lasting two hours, it can be tough for little ones).

This is a wondrous week, the holiest week of the year. Let’s not squander this opportunity to get caught up in the awesomeness of the Love of Christ Jesus.

Fr. Mark Pilon, RIP. Last week we lost a good and faithful priest, as Fr. Mark Pilon succumbed to his long battle with cancer, and died on the Feast of St. Joseph, patron of a “happy death.” As most of you will recall, Father Pilon was parochial vicar at St. Raymond’s, from 2009 to 2012, when he retired due to his health. We were honored to offer his funeral Mass here this last Friday, March 23.
Born in Detroit on March 23, 1943, Father grew up in a devoutly Catholic home attending Catholic schools. After earning his Bachelor’s in English from the University of Detroit in 1966, he taught at Bishop Ireton High School in Alexandria (1966-70), and was publisher and assistant editor of Triumph Magazine (1970-73). In 1975, he graduated from Holy Trinity Seminary in Dallas, and was ordained to the priesthood by Arlington Bishop Thomas J. Welsh on Nov. 29. He went on to earn a Master’s in Educational Administration from Catholic University (1978), a Sacred Theology Licentiate from the John Paul II Institute for Studies on Marriage and Family (Rome, 1987), and Sacred Theology Doctorate from the Pontifical University of the Holy Cross (Rome, 1991).
He held several different parish assignments over the years, as parochial vicar of St. Louis in Alexandria in (1975) and St. John in Front Royal from (1987-1990), and pastor of St. Ambrose in Annandale (1990 to 2000).
He also held various academic positions, at Bishop O’Connell High School (1977, 1981 to 1985), Catholic University (1978-79), Christendom College (1987-90), and finally at Mt. St. Mary’s Seminary (2000 to 2009).
Fr. Pilon was a brilliant man, a gifted teacher and preacher, and a wise and caring priest. I’m sure he is on his way to heaven, where he will receive wonderful rewards for his great work on Earth. But as he himself used to plead with me, let’s remember to keep praying for the perfection of his soul in Purgatory. Eternal rest grant unto him, O Lord, and may perpetual light shine upon him.

Congratulations, Natalie Butler. On a happier note… We’re all very proud of parishioner Natalie Butler, daughter of parish Secretary Mary Butler, for her outstanding collegiate basketball career, a career built on great spiritual courage, faith and grace.
Natalie began her college basketball career as a standout freshman at Georgetown, where she was named Big East Freshman of the Year. But for her sophomore year, she transferred from the internally troubled Georgetown team to the University of Connecticut. After a redshirt year she went on to play a pivotal role in UConn’s winning two NCAA national championships, despite, several devastating injuries along the way. For her final year of eligibility, Natalie transferred this year to George Mason to work on her Master’s degree, and immediately stepped into a starring role with the Patriots, leading her teammates to the most wins in school history and a spot in the WNIT tournament. Besides averaging 19.2 points per game and an astounding 16.6 rebounds per game this season, she also set several national records, including Women’s NCAA record for rebounds in a season, 563.
An amazing young woman. Congrats, Natalie, and may God continue to bless you!

Oremus pro invicem. Fr. De Celles

Fifth Sunday in Lent

Passiontide. Today we cover the statues and crosses as we begin the last two weeks of Lent, called “Passiontide.” At this point in Lent some people often start to slip in keeping their Lenten penances, while others haven’t yet begun their penances at all. Passiontide reminds us to refocus or deepen our attention on the season and its purposes of repentance of sin, conversion of heart, and appreciation of Christ’s love manifested in His Passion and Cross. If you’ve been slacking in your observance of Lent, buck up. If you’ve neglected the season entirely, it’s not too late. Let us beg our Crucified Lord to shower us with His grace in these last two weeks of Lent, and that we may be open to His grace and love Him in return. During Lent, our focus on our sins and God’s redeeming suffering and death for our sins are called to mind by the many outward signs of Lent. The bodily/physical reminders of these days are so important to our experiencing the meaning of the season—Jesus suffered and died for us in His human body. And so it is important to experience the mysteries of this season “in the flesh.” In our daily lives this is seen in our penances, including fasting and abstaining from meat. In the Mass we see it in the suppression of the Alleluia every day, and the Gloria on Sundays, as these joyful prayers are set aside during the sober and somber season. In Passiontide the elevated intensity of our focus is expressed in the outward and dramatic sign of covering the statues and crucifixes in our churches. In part, this is to encourage us to sort of place ourselves 2000 years back in time with Jesus during those last two weeks before His Crucifixion and Resurrection: Good Friday has not yet happened, so there is no cross yet; Easter has not happened, so no saints are in heaven. Keep this in mind in the coming days: “I’m walking with Jesus, and Peter and John and the apostles…With Judas. With Mary Magdalene and Salome and the other holy women. Walking toward Jerusalem, stopping in Bethany, going to the temple…. In the Upper Room, at the Last Supper…In the house of Caiaphas…In the palace of Pilate… Standing with Blessed Mary as they scourge her sweet child….” This focus “in the flesh” can be experience especially in our liturgical and prayer practices. So, please, come to the church and physically take part in the various sacraments, liturgies and other pious activities of the Church and parish in the next few weeks. I strongly encourage all of you to take advantage of the extra and longer confession times (we’ll have at least 2 priests hearing at most times, and sometimes 3 or 4). I also encourage you to go to one or more weekday Masses and spend time in Adoration of the Blessed Sacrament, especially during Exposition on Wednesday and Friday. Please participate in praying the Stations of the Cross, especially in the church this Friday evening at 6:30 pm, or Good Friday at 7:00 pm, with other parishioners led by a priest. I also strongly encourage you to participate in next Sunday’s (Palm/Passion Sunday, March 25) Solemn Procession with Palms at the beginning of the 10:30 Mass (NOTE: IN PRIOR YEARS THIS WAS AT 8:45). Those who would like to join in the procession should gather inside the Parish Hall before 10:30, and then, after some prayers and a Gospel reading, process outside, and enter the church from the front, taking their pews as normal. All this should take about 10 minutes. We will be reserving pews for those who join in
the procession, if they call (703-440-0535) or email (straychrch@aol.com) the office during the week (you need not call to join the procession). If you attend the 10:30 Mass, you may also simply take your seats in the church before Mass as usual and listen over the speakers in the church to everything said/sung in the Parish Hall. Note, pray for nice weather, but if it’s rainy, snowy or too cold, we may alter either the route or starting point of the procession (staying inside)—we’ll let you know on Palm Sunday.
Holy Week. Palm Sunday of the Passion of the Lord is, of course, the beginning of Holy Week. Next Sunday we will include a schedule for Holy Week, but I ask you now to plan ahead today. These are the most solemn and sacred days of the Christian year, marked by special and unique liturgies, including Holy Thursday’s evening Mass of the Lord’s Supper with the solemn procession and silent adoration of the Blessed Sacrament until midnight— “Can you not watch one hour with Me?” Then there’s Good Friday’s Celebration of the Passion of the Lord, with the Veneration of the Cross and Holy Communion, which begins at 3:00 pm—the hour of the Lord’s death. And finally, the Easter Vigil at the end of Holy Saturday evening. As your spiritual father I beg you to try to participate in all of these liturgies that are so important to experiencing the fullness of Catholic prayer in Holy Week. I especially recommend that you attend the 3:00 pm Good Friday service, with the Veneration of the Cross. Over the last few years I have been amazed and moved to see standing-room-only crowds. I know parking is a little difficult, and the 1-hour and 45-minute service is a long one, but I am always overwhelmed, edified and inspired as I see my good people humbly and happily accept these relatively minor inconveniences as a small sharing in the suffering of Jesus, as they wait patiently, many in tears, to venerate His Cross and to receive His Most Holy Body in Communion. It is a powerful liturgy—stark, dramatic, somber, mournful, and transformative. Some say, “but it’s a work day!” But I say: “it’s the hour of the Lord’s death! The most sacred hour in all time! Why would any Catholic want to be at work?”
Lenten Series. My last of five talks on “The Mass and the Eucharist” is this Thursday at 7:00 pm in the Parish Hall. This week I will be reviewing and giving a meditation on Eucharistic Prayer I, also called the Roman Canon. You hear this prayer most Sundays (and every Mass I celebrate), but have you ever really explored the poetry, symbolism and profound mysteries it is trying to express? Some think, “that prayer is so looonnngggg!” But if you have to listen to it anyway, why not figure out why so many of your favorite saints thought, “that prayer is so beautiful!” I am certain that by understanding this prayer a little better you’ll “get” a whole lot more out of every Mass you attend. If you weren’t able to attend the first 4 weeks, that’s okay—come to this last one: it can stand alone. If you ever feel like you’re not getting enough out of Mass, come to this talk! All are invited! Babysitting is available, but please call the office for reservations. (If you would like to catch up on prior weeks, you can view videos of those talks on our website.)
Oremus pro invicem. Fr. De Celles

Fourth Sunday of Lent

Laetare Sunday. Today is Laetare Sunday, or “Rejoice
Sunday.” It marks the halfway point in Lent, with the
Church reminding us that in the midst of our sorrows for
the suffering of Christ for our sins, we need to always
keep in mind the glory and joy of the Resurrection and our
Redemption. (Strictly speaking, the Thursday before
Laetare Sunday is the middle day of Lent, and it was at
one time observed as such, but centuries ago the special
signs of joy permitted on this day were transferred to the
Sunday following to make them more visible to more
folks).
Many have told me how they’ve struggled to keep
their penances this Lent. Many others have told me they
still haven’t chosen a penance. Today we remember that
there is still half of Lent remaining to rededicate or
increase our efforts to keep Lent holy. To those who
haven’t chosen a penance yet, get with it. To those who
are struggling to keep their penances, if your penance is
too hard, it’s okay change your penance to something that
is challenging, but manageable in your situation; to those
who just haven’t been trying, no excuses—pick up your
cross. And to those have found their penances manageable
and doable, then perhaps you can add some more
penances, or intensify the ones you are currently doing.
Let’s let the rest of Lent really be a time of
holiness for each of us, as we carry our crosses with Jesus,
and so become closer in unity with Him.
Important Transgender Conference. I am very pleased
to announce that the parish will be sponsoring a
conference here on the Saturday after Easter, April 7th
entitled, “Gender Ideology: The Cultural Challenge and
the Catholic Response.” About a year ago, several of the
priests were able to attend an excellent conference by 3
remarkable speakers discussing the cultural, philosophical
and scientific problems presented by the current push to
accept the new (trans)gender ideology. Now we are able to
present that program to you, with a special invitation to
parents (and grandparents) of school-aged children. We
cannot sit by and let the culture—especially the media,
social media, and the public schools—abuse our children
with this psychologically and spiritually destructive
ideology. Please mark you calendars and plan to attend—I
hope for a very large turnout. See the insert today for
more information.
(Interesting fact: two of the speakers, Mary
Hasson and Theresa Farnan are extremely impressive in
their own right, but adding to that is the fact that these two
sisters (biological, not nuns) are also daughters of the late
great Catholic jurist and apologist, Charles Rice).
Come to the Lenten Series this Week! My talks on “The
Mass and the Eucharist” continue this Thursday at 7pm in
the Parish Hall. These last 2 talks are, I think, the most
important of the series, as this week we will go through
the Mass, part by part, to understand Its profound meaning
and purpose more clearly, and next week we will discuss
and meditate on the beautiful and multi-faceted meaning of
Eucharistic Prayer I. If you weren’t able to attend the first 3
weeks, that’s okay—come to these. If you ever feel like
you’re not getting enough out of Mass, I think and hope
and pray that these two weeks may go a long way in
changing that! All are invited! Babysitting is available,
but please call the office for reservations. (If you would
like to catch up on prior weeks, you can view videos of
those talks on our website.)
Wind Storm. I don’t know about you, but I don’t recall
seeing anything like the sustained winds that blew through
our area last weekend. I’ve been through several hurricanes
in my life, and a few tornadoes, but those come and go
pretty quickly. Thanks be to God we had little damage to
our parish property, but many of our parishioners were not
so fortunate. There were innumerable fallen trees, a few
crashing down on houses and cars. One of our
parishioner’s houses even caught fire. And of course,
everyone seemed to suffer a power outage and the
consequent cold inside temperatures. (I knew I should have
had fireplaces added to the rectory in last year’s office
renovations!)
As far as I know, no one in the parish suffered any
injuries from the storm, but if you need any assistance due
to the storm, or know of someone who is, please let me
know. Again, thank God. Let’s all join in prayer for all
who suffered any losses, and give thanks to God for His
mercy.
40 Days for Life. Thanks to all of you who participated in
the prayer vigil last weekend. This year I know it was
particularly challenging, with the wind and cold the way it
was. God bless you for that. I’m sorry I had to call off our
participation on Friday, but as your Father, I thought it best
to pay attention to your safety—we can, did, go on to fight
another day.
Fr. Mark Pilon. We have received word that Fr. Pilon’s
liver cancer is suddenly progressing rapidly and not
responding to treatment. For those who don’t know, Fr.
Pilon was Parochial Vicar at St. Raymond’s for several
years, including 2 with me, until his retirement in 2012.
Prior to that he was a distinguished professor at Mt. St.
Mary’s Seminary for many years, and before that held
various positions in the Diocese, including pastor at St.
Ambrose.
Please keep Fr. Pilon in your prayers. He is a great
priest who has served Our Lord and His people well. And
he is good friend to many in this parish, especially me. Out
of respect for his privacy, please direct any questions or
communication to the parish office, and do not try to
contact him directly. Thank you.
P.S. I write in a hurry this week, so please forgive any
errors or confusion above.
Oremus pro invicem. Fr. De Celles

Third Sunday in Lent

Something to Pray About During Lent. I have often written and spoken about the choices we have in the manner we receive Holy Communion. In one column I wrote, after giving my reasons, “I recommend that all of my parishioners prayerfully consider receiving Communion on the tongue. However, it is your choice…I respect your choice.” The same can be said for the choice to kneel or stand.
Given that, I refer you to a new book published (in Italian) which includes a preface by Cardinal Robert Sarah, the Vatican’s Prefect of the Congregation for Divine Worship (i.e. the Church’s head of Liturgy), in which he wrote about these choices. What follows is an extract from this preface (from LifeSiteNews). I ask you to read it prayerfully.
“…Before the apparition of the Virgin Mary [at Fatima], in the Spring of 1916, the Angel of Peace appeared to Lucia, Jacinta and Francisco…[T]he children realized that the Angel…held in his left hand a chalice over which a host was suspended… saying: “Take and drink the Body and Blood of Jesus Christ, horribly outraged by ungrateful men. Make reparation for their crimes and console your God.” The Angel prostrated himself again on the ground, repeating the same prayer three times with Lucia, Jacinta and Francisco.
“The Angel of Peace therefore shows us how we should receive the Body and the Blood of Jesus Christ…But what are the outrages that Jesus receives in the holy Host, for which we need to make reparation?
“…[T]he most insidious diabolical attack consists in trying to extinguish faith in the Eucharist, by sowing errors and fostering an unsuitable way of receiving it. Truly the war between Michael and his Angels on one side, and lucifer on the other, continues in the hearts of the faithful: Satan’s target is the Sacrifice of the Mass and the Real Presence of Jesus in the consecrated Host. This robbery attempt follows two tracks: the first is the reduction of the concept of ‘real presence.’ Many theologians persist in mocking or snubbing the term ‘transubstantiation’ despite the constant references of the Magisterium…
“Let us now look at how faith in the real presence can influence the way we receive Communion, and vice versa. Receiving Communion on the hand undoubtedly involves a great scattering of fragments. On the contrary, attention to the smallest crumbs, care in purifying the sacred vessels, not touching the Host with sweaty hands, all become professions of faith in the real presence of Jesus, even in the smallest parts of the consecrated species: …The substance is the same! It is Him! On the contrary, inattention to the fragments makes us lose sight of the dogma. Little by little the thought may gradually prevail: “If even the parish priest does not pay attention to the fragments…then it means that Jesus is not in them…”
“The second track on which the attack against the Eucharist runs is the attempt to remove the sense of the sacred from the hearts of the faithful…. While the term ‘transubstantiation’ points us to the reality of presence, the sense of the sacred enables us to glimpse its absolute uniqueness and holiness. What a misfortune it would be to lose the sense of the sacred precisely in what is most sacred! And how is it possible? By receiving special food in the same way as ordinary food…
“The liturgy is made up of many small rituals and gestures — each of them is capable of expressing these attitudes filled with love, filial respect and adoration toward God. That is precisely why it is appropriate to promote the beauty, fittingness and pastoral value of a practice which developed during the long life and tradition of the Church, that is, the act of receiving Holy Communion on the tongue and kneeling. The greatness and nobility of man, as well as the highest expression of his love for his Creator, consists in kneeling before God. Jesus himself prayed on his knees in the presence of the Father….
“In this regard I would like to propose the example of two great saints of our time… St. John Paul II[‘s] …entire life was marked by a profound respect for the Holy Eucharist…. Despite being exhausted and without strength… he always knelt before the Blessed Sacrament. He was unable to kneel and stand up alone. …Until his last days, he wanted to offer us a great witness of reverence for the Blessed Sacrament. Why are we so proud and insensitive to the signs that God himself offers us for our spiritual growth and our intimate relationship with Him? Why do not we kneel down to receive Holy Communion after the example of the saints? Is it really so humiliating to bow down and remain kneeling before the Lord Jesus Christ? And yet, “He, though being in the form of God,… humbled himself and became obedient unto death, even death on a cross” (Phil 2: 6-8).
“St. Mother Teresa of Calcutta… had a respect and absolute worship of the divine Body of Jesus Christ…[F]illed with wonder and respectful veneration, Mother Teresa refrained from touching the transubstantiated Body of Christ. Instead, she adored him and contemplated him silently, she remained at length on her knees and prostrated herself before Jesus in the Eucharist. Moreover, she received Holy Communion in her mouth, like a little child who has humbly allowed herself to be fed by her God… The saint was saddened and pained when she saw Christians receiving Holy Communion in their hands…
“Why do we insist on receiving Communion standing and on the hand? Why this attitude of lack of submission to the signs of God? …Let us come as children and humbly receive the Body of Christ on our knees and on our tongue. The saints give us the example….!
“But how could the practice of receiving the Eucharist on the hand become so common? …It was a process that was anything but clear, a transition from what the instruction Memoriale Domini granted, to what is such a widespread practice today… Unfortunately, as with the Latin language, so also with a liturgical reform that should have been homogeneous with the previous rites, a special concession has become the picklock to force and empty the safe of the Church’s liturgical treasures…
“I hope there can be a rediscovery and promotion of the beauty and pastoral value of this method. In my opinion and judgment, this is an important question on which the Church today must reflect…”

Knights of Columbus Food Drive. Thanks to all of you who brought in food (and food cards and checks) last week. We collected 4,500 lbs. of food for the St. Lucy Project. A great way to practice the penance of “almsgiving.” And a great example of the service the Knights provide for our parish and diocese. If you’re a Catholic man over 18 years old—why aren’t you a Knight? Maybe you could do that for Lent: commit yourself to service by joining and being an active member?

Lenten Series. My talks on “The Mass and the Eucharist” continue this Thursday at 7:00 pm in the Parish Hall. All are invited—you need not have come last week!

Oremus pro invicem. Fr. De Celles

First Sunday of Lent

Lenten Series. I am very much looking forward to giving my
series beginning this Thursday evening at 7pm (a different
time than in the past). My topic will be “The Mass and the
Eucharist,” and this week we will be looking at what Scripture
and the Early Fathers of the Church had to say about the
Eucharist.
I really do hope that you will join us, especially if you
don’t usually attend these kinds of things. This year we’ve
added on-site babysitting so some of our younger married
couples can come. It would be good to come to all the talks,
but if you miss one or even most of them you can still get a lot
out of coming to the ones you can.

Acts of Penance. During Lent, Holy Mother Church calls on
all who are able to perform acts of penance. I hope you’ve
already picked out your penances for Lent, and that you don’t
wait until Holy Week to put them into action.
The three classic categories of penance are 1) prayer,
2) almsgiving (acts or gifts of charity), and 3) fasting
(sacrifice: “giving up” something). I recommend you choose
to do penances from all three of these categories—maybe a
very small penance from two of them, and a larger “main”
penance from the third. Maybe you could resolve to add one
extra short prayer to your daily routine, maybe a Hail Mary,
and to set aside one dollar every day to give to the poor box,
and then do a larger penance of some sacrifice, like giving up
your favorite beverage or food all during Lent.
Also, remember to pick penances that you are able to
accomplish—don’t be overly ambitious and try to carry a
burden that is way to heavy for you. Penances should
challenge us, but not overwhelm us. What often happens is we
choose a penance that is too difficult for us in our present state
in life, and then when we fail to keep it we get discouraged
and give up, and Lent is lost. So pick penances that are
realistic.
Also, penances should be things that you can easily
see that you are keeping. For example, if you resolve to just be
“nice” to everyone, how do you evaluate your success in this?
Rather, perhaps chose to try to be kinder to everyone, but to
do so in a particular way to a particular person—e.g., to bring
your office mate a cup of coffee every morning. Or if you
resolve to “pray more,” resolve specifically to pray an extra
Hail Mary before bed, or an extra 5 minutes in the morning.
Also, try to choose penances that may address
particular moral weaknesses you may have. For example, if
you struggle with the sin of gluttony, a sacrifice related to
food is a good idea. Or if you struggle from pride, maybe you
could say the “Litany of Humility” every day, or to humble
yourself by trying to hold door open for others whenever you
have the chance.
Daily Mass. Speaking of the Mass and doing penance during
Lent, one of the best penances is to go to Mass at least once
during the week—or even daily. We might not think of Mass
as a “penance”, but it is, of course, the greatest prayer of the
Church and puts us at the foot of the Cross, uniting our
prayers to the great prayer of Jesus on the first Good Friday—
what could be a better penance, especially during Lent?
Going to Mass during the week, especially daily,
strengthens us with the grace of the Blessed Sacrament so that
we can draw closer to Christ. Moreover, it also can change our
whole perspective on daily life, reminding us in a dramatic way
that our faith isn’t just for Sundays, but for every day and every
moment of the week.
The Sacrament of Confession. Lent also involves a second
type of “penance”—that is, the Sacrament of Penance (also
called “Confession” or “Reconciliation”). Two years ago I
published a small pamphlet called “Making a Good
Confession: A Brief Examination of Conscience and Guide to
Going to Confession.” Copies of this purple pamphlet can be
found by all the doors of the church and near the confessionals.
I hope you will find it helpful in preparing for and making a
good confession. Note: I am currently working on a version of
this “Guide” for children between about 11 and 14 years old,
and hope to have it in the church in the coming days.
The following paragraphs are taken from the
beginning of the “purple pamphlet”:
How do we make a “good Confession”? We begin by
prayerfully, and with honesty and humility, looking at our lives
to recognize the sins we’ve committed since our last
Confession, i.e., we make “an examination of conscience.” In
particular, we need to look for mortal sins, i.e., sins that
involve all three of the following criteria: 1) grave matter, 2)
full knowledge of the sinful character of the act, and 3)
complete consent. If any one of these is lacking it is not a
“mortal sin,” but may be a “venial sin.”
“Grave matter” means the act involves some very
serious moral evil, found either in 1) the act itself or 2) the
intention behind the act. Grave matter can be difficult to
identify, but not always.
Note that some sinful acts are grave matter when they
involve circumstances that are serious or very important but
are not grave matter if they involve only small or trivial things.
These acts that can be either grave or not are said to “admit of
parvity” (smallness). Many of the sins listed below would
“admit of parvity,” unless the word “serious” accurately
describes them. For example, a lie is always a sin, but lying
under oath is grave matter while lying about whether you like
someone’s outfit is not grave matter.
Also, in Confession you must distinguish the “kind” of
mortal sin committed: be clear about what the sin was, but
avoid graphic or long explanations. So it is not enough to
merely say “I had bad thoughts” or “I acted inappropriately,”
rather one should more specific, e.g. “I had lustful thoughts,”
etc.
You must also give the number of times you committed
particular mortal sins. Sometimes this is very difficult or even
impossible to remember, in which case, try your best give the
priest some idea of the frequency or number; e.g., “at least
once a month for several years,” etc.
Besides mortal sins, we should also consider
confessing (but are not required to confess) vices (sinful
habits) or other venial sins that are particularly problematic.
Have a blessed Lent.
Oremus pro invicem. Fr. De Celles

Sixth Sunday in Ordinary Time

FR. DE CELLES COLUMN – February 11, 2018

LENT. This Wednesday, February 14, is Ash Wednesday, the beginning of Lent, the season that calls us to meditate on and experience the immense love of God that would lead Him to die on the Cross for our sins. At the same time, it is also a time to consider our sins—how we have failed to love Him—and to work to overcome them, through our diligent efforts and His grace.
Ashes will be distributed at all 5 Masses on Ash Wednesday: 6:30am, 8am, 12noon, 5pm and 7pm. Since ashes are not a sacrament, they may be received by anyone who wishes to repent their sins—Catholic or not, in “good standing” or not. (Note: There are no confessions scheduled on Ash Wednesday).
Ash Wednesday and Good Friday are days of both fasting and abstinence, and every Friday in Lent is a day of abstinence. Failure to “substantially” keep these penances is grave matter (e.g., potentially a mortal sin). The law of abstinence requires that no meat may be eaten on these days and binds all Catholics who are 14 years old or older. No other penance may be substituted. The law of fasting binds those who are between the ages of 18 and 59. The Church defines “fasting,” for these purposes, as having only one full meal a day, with two additional smaller meals permitted, but only as necessary to keep up strength and so small that if added together they would not equal a full meal. Snacking is forbidden, but that does not include drinks that are not of the nature of a meal. Special circumstances can mitigate the application of these rules, i.e., the sick, pregnant or nursing mothers, etc.
Lent, of course, brings a much busier parish schedule, which we’ve laid out in detail in this week’s insert: please keep it in a central place to remind you of the many opportunities for spiritual growth the parish offers this Lent.
One important event on the schedule is the Women’s Retreat, which will be led by the Women’s Apostolate to Youth (WAY) on Saturday, February 24. I invite all women of our parish to bring their friends to what I think will be a very spiritually fruitful day. Please see the insert today for more details.

Lenten Series. As I mentioned 2 weeks ago, I will be giving this year’s Lenten Series, on my favorite topic: The Mass and the Eucharist.
How many times have I heard someone say that they don’t get much out of the Mass? I am convinced they would never say this if they really understood what was going on, not just in general, but thoroughly and profoundly.
If you want to get more “out of” the Mass, come to these talks, which begin next Thursday, February 22. IN FACT, I BEG YOU TO COME. In my experience, it seems to me that most Catholics have essentially an 8th grade level of understanding of what happens at the Mass, and those who have a better understanding often fail to adequately interiorize or spiritualize that understanding.
I love the Mass. You could say it is the reason I’m a priest; in fact, you might say that in a certain way it is the reason I am a Catholic, in that it draws me closer to Christ and His Church than anything else in my experience. Let me try to help you to share this love.
My first two talks will be about the Eucharist itself, beginning with the Biblical teaching, both in the Old and New Testament, then moving to what the early Church thought about the Eucharist, as explained in the writings of the early Fathers (Patristic), and then finally what the Church’s rich tradition teaches us today about the Eucharist.
Then the next three talks will focus more specifically on the Mass itself. First, I will explain how the Mass has developed from the first century to today. Then I will go through the Mass, part by part, with a mixture of explanation and meditation, trying show how the ritual brings the doctrine alive, and how the external actions of the Mass can be and should be expressions of our interior dispositions. And then finally I will give an in-depth explanation and meditation on the Eucharistic Prayer I, or “The Roman Canon.” A lot of folks ask me why I never use any other Eucharistic Prayer than this at Mass—I will explain why I think this prayer is so important to us.
This year we’ve also done two things which I hope will make it easier for some of you to attend: 1) we’ve moved the time to 7pm (from 7:30pm) and 2) we are providing on site babysitting (but you must call ahead and sign up for this, so we can have enough coverage).
I look forward to seeing you there on the 22nd and following.

Germain Grisez. I mentioned at my Masses last Sunday that the Church lost one of it’s greatest thinkers, as Dr. Germain Grisez passed from this life on February 1. Dr. Grisez is not well known by most Catholics in the pews, probably because his teaching style did not at all lend itself to television or radio appearances, or to popular reading. But every theologian and priest in the country knew he was one of the leading moral theologians in the world—of the first rank. His text book, “The Way of the Lord Jesus” (a four-volume tome), is used by most of the better seminaries in our country, and his writings in defense of traditional Catholic moral doctrine are standard reading for anyone who seriously studies Catholic theology. He was perhaps best known for his defense of Humanae Vitae in the 1960s and 70s, when he heroically stood out as the most outspoken and clearest thinking defender of the ancient teaching of the Church against the sin of contraception. He was also dedicated to systematically refuting the errors of proportionalism which infected the thinking of many moral theologians in the last few decades. He was a true “Lion” of the Church.
I was personally blessed to know and to take several classes with Dr. Grisez at Mt. St. Mary’s Seminary, where he lived, taught and wrote. I was especially blessed to have him as my advisor for my Master’s Thesis. What an amazing mind! But also what a good heart, as he would tear up when he would talk about his beloved and saintly wife, Jeanette, or some other topic near to his heart, like the Eucharist.
Some will correctly point out that Grisez had some interesting personality quirks, or that some of his proposals were questioned by even his closest collaborators. Even so, he was deeply revered by all the faithful theologians in the Church. He made a huge difference in the lives of so many priests, especially mine. And he helped me to become a much better priest and theologian than I could have ever been if I had not come to know him.
Requiem aeternam dona ei, Domine, et lux perpetua luceat ei. Requiescat in pace. Amen.

Oremus pro invicem. Fr. De Celles